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Manufacturing

Q.
How long does it typically take to manufacture a game?

The total timeframe for manufacturing a game can be divided into basically three sections: preproduction set up, manufacturing, and then shipping. Once you provide us with your finished artwork files and all project specifications have been finalized, the preproduction setup phase can run from 21 – 45 days, depending upon whether or not molds need to be constructed, artwork needs to be changed, etc.

Once all the preproduction samples of all components have been approved and manufacturing can begin, this phase usually runs 30 – 60 days, depending upon the production quantity, types of components to be produced, etc.

After the manufacturing and assembly has been completed and the goods are ready to be delivered to the overseas shipping port, the freight forwarding timeframe is approx. 30 days, depending upon the destination.

So, from start to finish the process takes anywhere from 90 -

Q.
What about quality control inspections?

Quality control inspections are very much a standard part of our project management process.  The factory personnel that we work with adhere to product quality levels and quality control inspection procedures that are defined by the American Nationals Standards Institute (ANSI).  These standards are widely accepted throughout the Toy and Game Industry. Our quality control criteria are specifically defined in all of our manufacturing proposals.

Q.
I need custom plastic pieces. Is this possible?

Yes. Custom plastic pieces require custom molds. The design of the piece determines how many molds will be required, the complexity of the mold, and therefore the cost. Also, the production volume sometimes plays a role in the size of the mold. In other words, we’ll design a mold that takes into consideration the quantity of pieces to be produced in a typical manufacturing timeframe. In rare instances, multiple molds need to be produced for components that are extremely high in production volume. That way, the manufacturing timeline do not get too extended.   

Q.
What is the difference between injection and compression molding?

There are a multitude of molding processes, and an even large array of plastics to mold with. Basically, injection molding is simply using melted plastic resin that is injected under high pressure into a mold that resembles a high-tech waffle iron. The mold essentially has two halves that close and then open after the plastic cools down and hardens. The complexity of the plastic part that is to be produced will define how detailed the mold needs to be.

Compression molding also uses a mold that resembles a high tech waffle iron, but instead of a liquid plastic resign that is injected into the mold, a powdered or granular (“urea”) material is placed into each of the cavities of the mold. The two halves of the mold close, and under extreme heat and pressure the powered material hardens into a solid. Standard spot dice and dominoes are examples of components that are made with compression molded urea.

Q.
What is “silk screen printing”?

Silk screen printing is a very old style of printing. It uses a very thin metal “screen” that has the image to be printed etched onto it, and throughout the image there are microscopic holes in a standard pattern that allow the ink to flow through the screen and onto the fabric, paper, or plastic component. Printing on fabric is most typically performed with silkscreen printing.

Q.
What is “pad printing”?

Pad printing, also called “tampo printing” is also a very old style of printing. It essentially uses a silkscreen printing process to apply ink to an image on a thin metal screen, but then a soft silicone “pad” (think of a very large, soft pencil eraser) presses down on the image which transfers the ink onto the pad. The pad then moves by automated machinery over the component to be printed on, and applies the ink to the component.

The benefit to using pad printing is that it enables printed images to be applied to very small areas, or areas on a component that are hard to reach with other printing processes.

Q.
My game needs pawns, dice, sand timers, spinner arrows, etc. Do I have to create new tooling for these items?

This is one of our specialties. We own a very large inventory of molds that will produce:

  • Dice (many sizes and styles) 
  • Polyhedrals
  • Pawns
  • Chips
  • Sand timers
  • Spinner Arrows 
  • Dice Cups
  • Dominoes
  • Lots more!

Talk to us about what you’re looking for, and we’ll let you know if we already have the molds that will that component. This is a great way to save a lot of money on up front tooling costs!

Q.
My game requires wood components. Is this a problem?

No. We work very closely with a few factories that can produce wood components. Whether it be letter tiles, wooden boxes, meeples, house and hotels, etc. we can get them produced for you.

Q.
Do you make toys?

Santa isn’t the only one who makes toys… We’re really well versed in making all sorts of products in the Toy & Game Industry. We can produce products that require plastic molding, printing, electronics, textiles, wood, metal, and a host of other materials. 

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You can even trigger another slide panel like inside of one!

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